Must it be? It Must be!

virtual-artifacts:

Shell with Inscriptions, India (Historic Hindustan), 18th century, Incised mother-of-pearl, Diameter 14.5 cm, AKM665 / Courtesy of Aga Khan Museum

virtual-artifacts:

Shell with Inscriptions, India (Historic Hindustan), 18th century, Incised mother-of-pearl, Diameter 14.5 cm, AKM665 / Courtesy of Aga Khan Museum

(via abluesforhoney)

70sbestblackalbums:

Marvin Gaye and his LEGEND!

71 “What’s Going On”is not only Marvin Gaye's masterpiece, it's the most important and passionate record to come out of soul music, delivered by one of its finest voices, a man finally free to speak his mind and so move from R&B sex symbol to true recording artist.”

What’s Going On was ranked number 6 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 2003 list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time

72 “Trouble Man” might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What’s Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it’s very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work”

73 “Let’s Get It On” the music is seductive in the most literal sense, its fluid grooves so perfectly designed for romance as to border on parody. With each performance laced with innuendo, each lyric a come-on, and each rhythm throbbing with lust, perhaps no other record has ever achieved the kind of sheer erotic force of Let’s Get It On, and it remains the blueprint for all of the slow jams to follow decades later — much copied, but never imitated.”

"If the most profound soul songs are prayers in secular dress, Marvin’s prayer is to reconcile the ecstasy of his early religious epiphany with a sexual epiphany. The hope for such a reconciliation, the search for sexual healing, is what drives his art … The paradox is this: The sexiest of Marvin Gaye’s work is also his most spiritual. That’s the paradox of Marvin himself. In his struggle to wed body and soul, in his exploration of sexual passion, he expresses the most human of hungers—the hunger for God. In those songs of loss and lament—the sense of separation is heartbreaking. On one level, the separation is between man and woman. On a deeper level, the separation is between man and God"  David Ritz

74 “Live” it’s still a great snapshot of Gaye at a key point in his career — the mid-’70s sabbatical from which he would never return quite the same”

76 “I Want You” The entire album has been referenced by everyone from Mary J. Blige to D’Angelo to Chico DeBarge and even Todd Rundgren, who performed the title track live regularly. By the time it is over, the listener should be a blissed-out container of amorous vibes. I Want You and its companion, Ware's Musical Massage, are the pre-eminent early disco concept albums. They are adult albums about intimacy, sensuality, and commitment, and decades later they still reverberate with class, sincerity, grace, intense focus, and astonishingly good taste. I Want You is as necessary as anything Gaye ever recorded.”

I Want You has earned retrospective recognition from writers and music critics as one of Gaye’s most controversial works and influential to such musical styles as disco, quiet storm, R&B, and neo soul.

77 “Live At The London Palladium” stands as the best and most readily available portrait of Gaye's live performances — a far different and more intimate experience than his studio releases and one that every fan should experience”

78 “Here, My Dear" Musically the album retains the high standards Gaye set in the early ’70s, but you can hear the agonizing strain of recent events in his voice, to the point where even several vocal overdubs can’t save his delivery. Stripped to its bare essence, Here, My Dear is no less than brilliantly unsettling and a perfect cauterization to a decade filled with personal turmoil.”

Initially a commercial and critical failure upon its release, it was later hailed by music critics as one of Gaye’s best produced albums in the years following Gaye’s death. “It’s taken me a while,” Anna Gordy admitted in later years, “but I’ve come to appreciate every form of Marvin’s music.”

81 “In Our Lifetime” is one of his finest later albums and captures him as his craft was maturing and becoming more multifaceted.”

82 “Midnight Love” is a classic Marvin Gaye effort. In addition to this project thriving with Gaye's enthusiastic spirit, it has his harmonious background vocals, his stunning vocal arrangements and his creative penmanship, as he wrote all the selections.”

"The album made an impact on future R&B recordings. The Isley Brothers, who released their album, Between the Sheets, in April of 1983, took the same musical approach of Midnight Love and add it to their album. Gordon Banks stated the album “influenced a lot of people doing a mellow thing with a funk vibe in it”. Because the album was also among the first pop albums to use a Roland TR-808, the style would be copied by other artists of similar genres in the years to come. In the wake of its success, “Sexual Healing” became one of Gaye’s most covered songs as well as being sampled by several artists in the hip-hop and R&B genres. The demo version of “Turn On Some Music” was sampled for Erick Sermon's hit, “Music”, giving full credit to Gaye as a leading vocalist, giving Gaye a posthumous top 40 hit in 2001, 17 years after his death. In 1998, Sony Music re-released the album as a two-CD “Legacy” edition set titled Midnight Love and the Sexual Healing Sessions. The same edition would be re-released in 2007, to celebrate the album’s 25th anniversary since its release.”

notes from: www.allmusic.com   www.wikipedia.org

















(via purpro)

hyperallergic:


Erik Van Uden, “Extra-Terrestrial Ice Cream” (2014). 9”x12”. Acrylic and modeling paste on wood panel.

hyperallergic:

Erik Van Uden, “Extra-Terrestrial Ice Cream” (2014). 9”x12”. Acrylic and modeling paste on wood panel.

(via abluesforhoney)

“You have to strong enough to say if the culture doesn’t work, don’t buy it. Create your own.”
— Tuesday’s with Morrie, by Mitch Albom (via 4curious)
Karma Police
Radiohead / OK Computer

sadmusicforsadbastards:

"For a minute there, I lost myself"

(via nutopia9)

8,927 plays

summervirgin:

Look  at them eyes…how could one say no.

(via baconeggandcheesebagelsandwiches)

starrydiadems:

Twilight Calm by Christina Rossetti illustrated by Florence Harrison.

starrydiadems:

Twilight Calm by Christina Rossetti illustrated by Florence Harrison.

(via quietone317)